The Charles Hosmer - Morse Museum of American Art



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On Exhibit

Exhibitions in the Museum’s galleries are changed periodically to enable the public to see more of the permanent collection and to bring a broader understanding of developments in American art. Current exhibitions on view include:

  • Louis Comfort Tiffany’s
    Laurelton Hall

    Ongoing

    This comprehensive exhibition on Louis Comfort Tiffany’s celebrated Long Island home, Laurelton Hall, features the restored Daffodil Terrace and approximately 200 objects from or related to the estate.
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  • Louis Comfort Tiffany’s Life and Art

    Ongoing

    Reflecting on his artistic career at a celebration of his 68th birthday in 1916, Louis Comfort Tiffany characterized his work across various media as a lifelong “quest of beauty.” Few artists have been as energetic or as successful as was Tiffany (1848–1933) in establishing that aesthetic ideal in the American home. Louis Comfort Tiffany’s Life and Art examines through art objects, archival documents, and artifacts Tiffany’s astonishingly diverse work in the decorative arts over the course of his lifetime.
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  • Tiffany Art Glass from the Morse Collection

    Ongoing

    Tiffany Studios was arguably the most accomplished maker of art glass in the world in its day and undoubtedly one of the best of all time. In this new installation, the Morse presents examples of Tiffany art glass that richly illustrate the artist’s mastery of this medium.
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  • The Spoon Collectors

    Ongoing

    The Spoon Collectors, a new vignette, will showcase the fascinating assortment of souvenir spoons collected by the Charles Hosmer Morse and Hugh F. McKean families. Drawn from a collection of more than 550 spoons, the selection on view will be organized by subjects—from forts to flowers and saints to skylines— the icons of particular places and events that marked the miles and smiles of a traveler’s journey. A booming business for silver makers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, these objects were treasured by the Morses and McKeans for their charm and memories—the same reasons souvenirs have been so collected throughout history.
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  • Focus Exhibition: Tiffany Studios’ Daffodil Reading Lamp

    Ongoing

    Louis Comfort Tiffany loved daffodils—a flower that heralds spring and is rich in symbolic meaning. Not only did he cultivate them and plant them prominently at his Long Island country estate, Laurelton Hall, he created his own versions in glass for windows, lamps, and column capitals. From the shape of its base to the decoration of its leaded-glass shade, the Morse Museum’s beautiful Daffodil lamp, c. 1899 to 1905, from Tiffany Studios well rewards a careful and thorough examination. Through objects and explanatory wall panels, this exhibition presents an in-depth study of the lamp, from its inspiration and significance to its design and production.
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  • Tiffany Lamps and Lighting from the Morse Collection

    Ongoing

    Although Louis Comfort Tiffany was an international success before his first lamp, his signature style of lighting has certainly extended the breadth and depth of his popularity across America and through time, from the 1890s to this day. With his lamps and lighting fixtures, Tiffany created a uniquely beautiful and clever look for illumination that captured the American and European audience and even now fascinates and charms people all over the world.
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  • The Bride Elect—
    Gifts from the 1905 Wedding of
    Elizabeth Owens Morse

    February 10, 2015 through September 24, 2017

    In 1905 Elizabeth Owens Morse, the daughter of Charles Hosmer Morse and Martha Owens Morse, married Richard Genius. The Morse presents a representative group of the lovely gifts that survive from the Morse-Genius wedding, including Tiffany art glass, Rookwood pottery, and Gorham silver.
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  • Revival & Reform—Eclecticism in the 19th-Century Environment

    Ongoing

    The Arts window, c. 1894, by J. & R. Lamb Studios is the centerpiece of this major new exhibition that illustrates the rich diversity of styles that made up the visual environment of the late 19th century in both Europe and America. Lamb Studios, a prominent American glasshouse of the era, exhibited the neoclassical window widely. In preparation for its debut at the Morse, the window, more than eight feet in diameter, underwent extensive conservation. The installation, organized from objects in the Museum’s collection, features about 20 additional leaded-glass windows and selections of art glass, pottery, and furniture, a number of which also have never been exhibited. Besides works by Lamb, windows on view—some avant-garde, others reviving styles of the past—include examples by Tiffany Studios, John LaFarge, Frank Lloyd Wright, Edward Burne-Jones, Donald MacDonald, and Heaton, Butler & Bayne.
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  • Lifelines—Forms and Themes of Art Nouveau

    February 12, 2013 through September 25, 2016

    In French, Art Nouveau literally means “new art,” and at the turn of the 20th century, this new art looked different, felt different, and reflected different values and ideas. Through more than 100 objects from the Museum’s collection, this exhibition explores the interrelated elements that define this style so well known for its lively line and organic form. The exhibition—featuring furniture, architectural ornaments, lamps, jewelry, ceramics, and art glass from more than 50 makers, designers, and artists working across nine countries—is organized into groups that illustrate such dominant Art Nouveau themes as nature, female form, and metamorphosis.
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  • Arts and Crafts from the Morse Collection

    Ongoing

    “Have nothing in your houses which you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful,” William Morris declared in 1880. Morris (1834–96) was a leader of the Arts and Crafts movement, which originated in Britain in the late nineteenth century and soon spread to America. This gallery highlights Arts and Crafts objects from the Museum's collection.
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  • Tiffany Chapel

    Ongoing

    The celebrated chapel interior that Louis Comfort Tiffany created for exhibition at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago opened as an exhibition at the Morse in April 1999, becoming available to the public for the first time in more than 100 years. The mosaic and glass masterpiece, a testament to his design genius, established Tiffany’s reputation internationally.
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  • Secrets of Tiffany Glassmaking

    Ongoing

    Updated installation opened September 4, 2012. Through photographs, models, tools, and art objects, this teaching exhibit shows the range of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s glass production, from mosaics and molded-glass jewels to leaded-glass windows and lamps, providing insights into the techniques employed by his artisans.
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  • Paintings from the Morse Collection

    Ongoing

    This recently updated gallery of primarily American paintings features more than 20 works representing a variety of late 19th-century styles, including portraiture, genre scenes, and landscapes.
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  • Art Jewelry, Favrile Metalwork & Precious Glass by Louis Comfort Tiffany

    Ongoing

    This permanent gallery features about three dozen objects, including 11 pieces of jewelry that Tiffany designed for the new art jewelry division he established at Tiffany & Co. after his father died in 1902.
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